12 Point Brexit Logistics Planning Checklist

12 Point Brexit Logistics Planning Checklist

Extension, Election, Revocation, Referendum, Resignation, Deal, No Deal.

The list goes on. Who knows where we will be with Brexit tomorrow?

As you’ll have seen, the Government No Deal awareness campaign is in full swing but still lacks clarity and concise information on their website www.gov.uk/brexit for Importers and Exporters.

The 12 Point Importers and Exporters Checklist

We believe we have all bases covered here with customs software and training both in place.

To help our customers, many of whom have been going around in circles over the last few months, we’ve researched created 12 point exporter and importer to-do lists.

Have you and your customers and suppliers got all the boxes ticked? Download the Checklists below.

What Brexit help and guidance can Espace offer?

On our website our MD, Tony Shally has highlighted many of his current concerns and the predicted effects of a No Deal exit on the European road freight market. His letter to customers, the checklists and other useful information for Brexit planning can all be found in our dedicated Brexit Section.

We’re ready with our customs software, training and Dover based customs clearance agent to assist with additional declarations and transit documents.

If you have any specific Brexit questions, just email brexit@espaceglobalfreight.com or give us a call on 01543 418700.

European Truck Driver Shortage Update

European Truck Driver Shortage Update

Best estimates put a figure of 20% of tractor units standing empty all over Europe.

Why? We simply haven’t got enough European HGV drivers. In the U.K and Germany alone, a shortage of 300,000 HGV drivers is predicted by 2020.

With e-commerce having an increasing share of all retail sales in the uk, up from 16.4-18% between 2017 and 2018, the demand for transport services is growing rapidly. Supply of transport on the other hand, is falling.

Basic economics has kicked in. The days of a forwarder or logistics company dictating rates to European and UK hauliers are long gone. UK and European haulage rates have been steadily increasing throughout 2017 and continue to do so.

To add to the existing crisis, the Freight Transport Association fears that the UK’s impending departure from the European Union will greatly exacerbate the problem of driver shortages and shortfalls of staff within the wider logistics sector, with concerns that this is already beginning to happen.

For more information about how Brexit will affect your shipment visit our Brexit page Here.

Brexit Update – Postponed VAT Accounting for imports

Brexit Update – Postponed VAT Accounting for imports

Postponed VAT

In the event of a no deal Brexit the UK government have announced they will introduce Postponed VAT Accounting (PVA) for both EU and non-EU imports by UK registered businesses.

This will enable VAT registered businesses to declare and recover import VAT on their VAT returns, rather than having to pay it upfront and subsequently recover it on their VAT return.

How will this work?

Registration will not be required for importers to use PVA. The intention to use PVA for an import will be declared on the customs entry.

This will come into effect from Day 1 of a no deal Brexit, however it will be optional. VAT can still be paid upfront if an importer wishes to do so.

What statements will be issued?

C79 VAT certificates will not be issued for goods declared using PVA. Instead a monthly postponed import VAT statement will be made available for importers via the government digital service.

This statement will indicate the total VAT postponed for the previous month in order to declare this on the quarterly VAT return.

PVA currently does not exist in the UK. More details on this service will be published by the government in due course.

Other VAT deferral methods.

The currently allows two systems for import VAT deferral (standard deferral and SIVA).

SIVA (Simplified Import VAT Accounting) requires a lower level of financial security than standard import VAT deferral. We therefore suggest importers seek SIVA approval first. VAT registered businesses can apply for SIVA online
 

Need more help on Brexit?

For more information on how the UK’s attempts to leave the EU will affect your business visit our Brexit Import & Export Guide.

Brexit Update

Espace Freight Forwarders

BREXIT UPDATE 28th February 2019

No doubt you will have had a barrage of emails from freight forwarders over the last few months telling you what steps you need to take now in the event of a ‘No Deal’ on 29th March.
If Parliament cannot agree on a deal, it now looks like we will be heading towards an extension as it’s clear that there is a Parliamentary majority for not crashing out without a deal. Needless to say at the end of any extension period, if an agreement cannot be reached, the default position would still be ‘No Deal’ so we all still need to be making plans to deal with this eventuality.
Whatever happens; deal or no deal, how we trade with the EU will change in the future when we exit or get to the end of an agreed transition period. Customs intervention will be needed. Things cannot stay as they are as we will be out of the single market the Customs Union.
There is a possibility of an extension to Article 50 and transition period if we get a deal agreed. However, at some point export and import declarations will need to be made and new procedures in place for the collection of any UK import VAT and duty. Our advice would be to look at these points now. Nobody knows what’s going to happen and when it will.
As there are very different implications for exporters and importers, I have summarised what I see to be the priority action points in two sections.
UK EXPORTERS
1. Register for a UK EORI number.
2. Choose an agent/broker to make your customs declarations for you if you cannot make them yourselves. Prices for basic entries have dramatically increased recently as demand is far outstripping supply. We can offer this service for you for both exports and imports.
3. Select a commodity code for your goods. Commodity codes classify goods and are a requirement for the customs entry.

4. Choose the correct CPC (Customs Procedure Code). CPC’s identify the customs regimes to which goods are being entered to or removed from. If it is a permanent export to EU it will be code 10 00 001. For other regimes such as; temporary export for an exhibition or for repair in the EU, it will be a different CPC code. More information on CPCs can be found at … https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-trade-tariff-customs-procedure-codes/customs-procedure-codes-box-37
5. Review your contractual Incoterms as they will determine who is responsible for customs declarations and any EU import VAT and duty. Our advice would be that if you are exporting on Ex Works terms, as a bare minimum you take over control of the UK Export declaration. You may find FCA is a more appropriate incoterm to use.
6. The export declaration, sometimes known as a COPY 3 SAD, provides safety and security declarations along with permission for the goods to leave the UK territory.
7. Leaving the organisation of this HMRC requirement to the EU importer could result in delays trying to obtain clearance resulting in delays. The export declaration is your proof of export and should be retained in your records for 6 years. If you sell on DDP, Delivered Duty Paid terms, be careful, many people can interpret DDP terms as including EU VAT which you will not be able to recover. DAP Delivered at Place is another alternative INCO term which allocates responsibility for Import VAT and duty to the EU importer.
8. Consider Authorised consignor status. An authorised consignor is a person / entity authorised by HMRC to carry out customs transit operations. This allows goods to travel under bond to and from authorised premises. The Common Transit Convention (CTC) allows you to move goods across certain borders without paying import duties, until the goods arrive at their final destination where any duties and taxes will be accounted for. A transit declaration is raised and submitted electronically, it will indicate the transit points the goods will be travelling to and from e.g. Birmingham – Rotterdam. After the UK leaves the EU, the UK will stay in the CTC. There’ll be little change to the current process for using CTC after 29 March 2019. Further information can be found in the following link: https://www.revenue.ie/en/customs-traders-and-agents/transit/index.aspx.
9. If you wanted to look at this in more detail, we’d advise you engage a customs specialist. We can recommend a very good one.
10. EU Customs agent will be needed to perform customs clearance of any goods inbound from the UK. Your European customers will need to appoint a preferred agent to do this for them. The process is a lot quicker if they have a VAT and duty deferment account. We have access to a network of European customs agents. However, the normal procedure is for the EU importer to appoint their own agent and agree fees in advance.
11. WTO Tariffs. With a ‘no deal, no transition period’ we would not have a Free Trade agreement with the EU and our exports could have tariffs levied on them. Enter your commodity code into this website to see what the current EU tariff is on your goods for shipments from outside the EU. https://www.trade-tariff.service.gov.uk/trade-tariff/headings/0707?currency=EUR&day=8&month=1&year=2019
12. Pallets. Currently for non-EU countries exporting goods to the EU, the EU require pallets to be heat-treated or cleaned to prevent contamination and specifically marked. As there is a huge shortage of these specific pallets in the UK, the likelihood is that the EU will waiver this requirement for a period of time. Also, if you return pallets or any sort of packaging to an EU customer, this could be classed as an UK export and need an export declaration. UK customs experts are currently discussing this return packaging issue with UK Customs.

UK IMPORTERS
1. Apply for TSP (Transitional Simplified Procedure). It takes a few minutes only. https://www.gov.uk/guidance/register-for-simplified-import-procedures-if-the-uk-leaves-the-eu-without-a-deal. This appears to be the best solution for many traders. Only available to UK Importers. Applicants must be a UK registered company. The main benefits are (1) the application process is simple, (2) the importer pays duty (if any) by direct debit and (3) the import process does NOT require any form of entry at the UK Port of arrival; you need only present the importer’s EORI number, if asked. Final import entry is not due until the 4th working day of the following month. It is unclear at this point if your customs agent / broker can make this final import declaration for you. However, TSP is not available for all classifications of goods. The import of all non-controlled goods can be done via TSP. Traders using TSP will need their own duty deferment account in place by 30th June 2019
2. Make sure your EU supplier is aware of their responsibilities. They will need to have an export declaration made via their country’s Customs system. Goods cannot leave their country before permission to proceed has been granted by their Customs authority. They need to partner with a preferred customs agent / forwarder and contact their authorities for full governmental requirements.
3. If they do not have an EU EORI number they will need to apply for one.
4. More information will be needed on their invoices. Values and weights of goods for each commodity code, CPC codes and office of exit from EU. As with UK exports, you will need to pay attention to the INCO terms agreed with your supplier and these must be stated on their invoices.
5. Consider how you will pay VAT. The Government has stated that they will introduce Postponed VAT Accounting (PVA) in the event of a ‘no-deal’. VAT will not be applied on Imports at the point of UK entry. C79 VAT certificates will not be issued for goods using PVA. Instead a monthly postponed import VAT statement will be made available for importers via the Government Gateway service. The statement will indicate the total postponed VAT from the previous month in order to declare this on the quarterly VAT return
6. Consider how you will pay duty. For duty, there are a few options; a duty deferment account, FAS (Flexible Accounting System) payments or use an Agents Deferment account. Under TSP, duty will be taken by direct debit initially. By 30th June 2019, a financial guarantee will be needed for any duties deferred. As we will no longer be part of the EU, our Government has total control over UK import tariffs for imported shipments from EU and non-EU countries. They have confirmed that the new UK import tariffs will be issued soon and once available, UK importers should no longer use the current EU version. (See exports point 4.)

If you need any help or further advice please just get in touch. There’s a lot to take in for both exporters and importers. As far as customs is concerned, I’m very much self-taught. I have a couple of expert customs training / advisory companies that I have been working with. Anything I cannot help with, I’d be happy to pass their contact details on.
Best regards,

Tony Shally
Managing Director


M:07947 641017
DD:01543 412311
E: TonyShally@espaceglobalfreight.com
W:www.espaceglobalfreight.com

Clean Air Zones… Toxic For The Freight Industry?

Clean Air Zones… Toxic For The Freight Industry?

What are these proposed Clean Air Zones?

Birmingham City Council defined a Clear Air Zone as “an area where a targeted action is taken to improve air quality. Clean Air Zones aim to reduce all types of air pollution, including nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter, so that people breathe in less of all these pollutants.”

The measures proposed to create these Clear Air Zones involve improving the flow of traffic or introducing a  new scheme like park and ride. Councils will also consider the charging of most polluting vehicles which enter the zone; This will most certainly mean the charging of HGV’s Vehicles.

These Clean Air Zones have been planned for a couple of places which are:

  • Aberdeen – Planned by 2020
  • Bath and North East Somerset – Planned for 2020
  • Birmingham – Planned for 2019
  • Southampton – Planned for 2019
  • Leeds – Planned for 2020
  • Glasgow – Rolling out between 2018 and 2022
  • Dundee – Planned for 2020
  • Edinburgh – Planned for 2020

However, Clean Air zones are currently present in London and Oxford.

The Impact It Will Have

The proposed HGV charge for trucks is about £100 a day; However, Euro VI trucks will be exempt from these charges. These daily charges on trucks will only raise the rates within the freight industry which will likely be passed on to the customer which will cause a rise in inflation – Around 90% of goods have been transported by truck at some point in the supply chain.

The Clean Air Zone charges will push haulers to upgrade their fleet to Euro VI trucks; This will impact on smaller SMEs the most. The practical solution is to this is to give businesses a practical timescale to comply. Many companies will be in lease agreements on their fleets which will go beyond 2019; These agreements are not easy to get out of and can be costly.

BIFA Takes Control of the Brexit Bus

Yesterday, Theresa May invoked Article 50, which means the formal process of the UK leaving the EU has begun. The outcome of Brexit will have a heavy impact on the way the industry operates. Currently, the industry is filled with speculation of how things will evolve. The British International Freight Association has decided it will assist the Government in discussions on topics such as the possibilities of a free trade agreement or otherwise.

Robert Keen, Director General of the British International Freight Association (BIFA), says: “In the run-up to the UK’s eventual exit we will be working with Government to try and ensure that the movement of the UK’s visible import and export trade does not become overburdened by over complicated trade procedures.”

“Clearly there are significant areas of concern for our members, which are responsible for much of the physical movement of that trade, over the eventual outcome, including the physical infrastructure, trade arrangements and Customs practices that will be reviewed as part of the Brexit negotiations.”

“I have already gone on the record to warn about the huge number of pundits offering solutions when nobody knows what is likely to happen in reality.”

“BIFA’s focus now will be presenting the views of our members to the various government departments that we deal with, as well as working with organisations such as the Confederation of British Industry and International Chamber of Commerce to make sure that all parties negotiating the post-Brexit landscape are fully aware of the potential challenges for which they will need to find solutions.”

Having BIFA working with the government for Brexit can only be seen as a positive for the industry and it members. It is evident that BIFA has the experience and understanding of the industry which makes them the perfect advisers to the government on such matters.

The worst possible outcome for the industry would be going back 40 years before the common market to the complexity of the carnets and similarly complex documents required to navigate various European customs points. Hopefully, this can all be avoided, but in the current climate, nothing is certain.

Luckily We Have A 7 Key Points Survival Guide For Importers And Exporters

 

 

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